Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)

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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #300

Postby Faustus5 » Sun Sep 15, 2019 4:57 pm

maz89 wrote:Hey guys! I see that there is just way too much here for me to comment on, so I'll just jump to my question: what did you guys make of Tarantino's latest "love letter" to Hollywood? I'm still processing the experience... my gut feeling is that it is one of Tarantino's best. I sure enjoyed the hell out of it, even if I need to sit down and make sense of some of it. Have either of you seen it? Any plans?


I loved it. Don't think it will top Pulp Fiction or Jackie Brown for me, but it has some of his best scenes. I'll have to watch it again when it gets released on Blu Ray to make up my mind.

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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #301

Postby maz89 » Mon Sep 16, 2019 9:53 pm

Parts of it just kinda blew me away. He took the same concept of using cinema to rewrite history in Inglourious Basterds and elevated it here. I wonder if I loved it so much because I saw it in the cinema - it's been so long since I'd been in one. Curious to see how it holds up when I see it at home.
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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #302

Postby Raxivace » Tue Sep 17, 2019 7:57 am

I've been spoiled a bit on the ending but not on the context of it really. All that I know is that there were a lot of annoying think pieces online about how young millennials don't seem to know who Charles Manson was.
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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #303

Postby Raxivace » Wed Sep 18, 2019 10:07 pm

126. Armored Trooper VOTOTMS: Case;Irvine (2010, Dir. Shisho Igarashi) – Irvine is a mecha mechanic, however unbeknownst to his little sister he secretly participates in “Battling”, a sort of underground mecha fight club. Irvine is paid to throw a match against, though not before humiliating his opponent Paygun. Paygun, his pride wounded, seeks to murder Irvine and his sister for revenge…

For a 50 minute film its okay. I enjoyed the mecha action and while there’s not much to these characters it works well enough for the kind of film this is. Hardly the best thing in the VOTOMS franchise but its not some huge disaster either.

127. VOTOMS Finder Armored Trooperoid (2010, Dir. Atsuhi Shigeta) – The first (And as of this writing, only) VOTOMS AU! This follows Aki Tesuno, a “Bottomer” who wishes he could live among the elite upper class in the “Top”. Unfortunately he works as a scavenger in a glorified junk yard. However, he gets hired by some upper class society to help find a kidnapped princess. Turns out though, they’re the ones trying to kidnap the princess. Mecha battles ensue.

This is the worst VOTOMS entry by far. It just feels so average in everything it does. Average characters, average acting, fairly average setting for this kind of story etc. The only kind of neat thing is how they remix some elements from the original VOTOMS here, but its only done in the broadest possible strokes.

If this were longer than 40 minutes they might have been able to develop it in something better, but they didn’t. It’s perhaps telling that more VOTOMS AU entries didn’t come from this.

128. Armored Trooper VOTOMS: Chirico’s Return ~ Alone Again (2011, Dir. Kazuyoshi Takeuchi) – As of this writing this is the final VOTOMS entry altogether. Even though this largely exists to bridge Shining Heresy and Phantom Arc together, I can’t help but feel this is in some ways the more appropriate ending to Chirico’s story. Still, it’s a nice for what it is, and explains the setup for Phantom Arc well enough and why Titania isn’t running around in that series.

“In the end Chirico disappeared, leaving us with nothing but speculation”. That final line of this film alone is probably a better sendoff to Chirico than Phantom Chapter's ending is.

129. It (Rewatch, 2017, Dir. Andy Muschietti)

130. It: Chapter 2 (2019, Dir. Andy Muschietti) – [url]You can basically copy everything I said about It last time because it mostly applies to both my rewatch of the first film and also Chapter 2[/url], which I liked and generally found preferable to the adult stuff in the 1990 version. Good stuff.

That being said, I’m sorry but having played Street Fighter 1 now I don’t believe for god damned second that anyone would have liked it as much as the kids in these movies did, let alone liked it enough to have nostalgia for it 27 years later. That’s far more unrealistic and unbelievable than magical killer clowns from space.

Also there was a surprise Peter Bogdanovich cameo in Chapter 2 wtf.

131. Godzilla: King of the Monsters (2019, Dir. Michael Dougherty) – Pretty mindless “Godzilla fights a bunch of other monsters” movie with enjoyable supporting cast of actors from prominent TV shows from the last few years. Its pretty enjoyable for what it is, though inferior to Anno’s Shin Godzilla. I did like it more than the Netflix trilogy though.

132. Fassbinder’s “Berlin Alexanderplatz” Remastered: Notes on the Restoration (2007, Dir. Juliane Lorenz)

133. Notes on the Making of “Berlin Alexanderplatz” (1979, Dir. Hanz-Dieter Hartl)

134. Fassbinder’s “Berlin Alexanderplatz”: A Mega Movie and Its Story (2007, Dir. Dir. Juliane Lorenz) – These were all special features on the Berlin Alexanderplatz blu-ray. The two by Lorenz are pretty typical talking head documentaries- the restoration one, as you can probably guess, goes into the technical challenges that came with remastering the series. It’s kind of interesting though I’m not sure there’s anything particularly unique about the challenges faced with restoring this particular show.

The “Mega Movie” documentary is mostly just interviews with the cast and crew as they reflect back on making the series. This one was better, though not exceptional. I did think it was funny that actress who played Eva not only had not watched the whole series, but flat out confused her character with Mieze.

The Hartl film is very much one of those “cinema verité on the movie set” documentaries that’s largely just footage of Fassbinder directing the show itself- it kind of reminded me of the doc that Chris Marker made about the making of Akira Kurosawa’s Ran in that aspect. I’m not a huge fan of verité documentaries to begin with, though this was probably my favorite of this trio here. Its at least interesting to get to watch Fassbinder work and see how he deals with challenges like making sure the cars in various street scenes drive by at the specific times he wants. Its also pretty lean at 45 minutes.

Which leads me to…

--------------------

Berlin Alexanderplatz (1980) – I had only seen one other Rainer Werner Fassbinder film before and had been curious about seeing more from. I decided to just dump into the deep end and check out this miniseries he made.

I’m very glad I made that decision because I thought this was fantastic. The basic story follows a man named Franz Biberkopf, recently released from prison after having been rightly convicted of murdering his wife. He decides he wants to honestly change his violent ways and become a good person.

Unfortunately for Franz, this is Berlin circa 1927. Things are changing in the culture here, and not for the better.

We basically follow Franz as he attempts get honest work (None of which last), goes through various girlfriends (None of whom last), and gets involved with shady people (Most of whom last). Reinhold is probably the most notable character that Franz meets in the last group and I don’t think I’ve done so many 180’s on a single character in quite a long time. I went from thinking he was just an odd guy, to history’s greatest monster, to thinking maybe he’s not so bad, to thinking he’s worse than History’s greatest monster, and settling on an uneasy mix of pity and contempt.

It’s pretty similar to my feelings on Franz himself. Günter Lamprecht is somehow able to convincingly play him as charismatic, pitiable and childish, and horrifyingly monstrous even compared to some of the other characters here (And when one of those characters is Reinhold, that’s saying something). Like its easy to get drawn into his weird spell and forget what Franz even went to prison for until they start playing the flashback of Franz murdering his wife over and over and over and over again and contrasting it with different events in the story.
I think that’s really makes this stand out so much from modern American TV to me. Characters are allowed to be genuinely reprehensible and not in the “cool edgy antihero” sense (Though I like a lot of those stories too).

Oh yeah and then comes the Epilogue. Oh boy that fucking epilogue is glorious. After 13 episodes of nostalgic naturalism, we go into full blown David Lynch meets End of Evangelion apocalyptical surreal nightmare. Classic sets from the rest of the series are turned into hellish nightmares, we watch the characters thrown through a literal butcher, visions of atomic weaponry, tons of rats running around, macabre dead hanging from trees, 20’s music from the rets of the series is replaced by tracks from bands like the Velvet Underground, visions of Nazi atrocities appear to Franz.

It’s like if a Christopher Isherwood novel suddenly turned into Dante’s Inferno. It’s fucking nuts and I love it. It’s really hard to describe just how huge of a shift in style this really is without having been lulled into certain expectations by the first 13 episodes. I know I just compared it End of Evangelion, but perhaps its more akin to the TV ending. This is partly because the episode is explained as being in Franz’ mind (Or as “Fassbinder’s dream of Franz’s dream” or whatever the episode is called), though that doesn’t quite explain the visions of the future, the use of anachronistic music etc. It really does feel more like Franz has gone to Hell or some kind of weird vision quest or something.


It’s good stuff.
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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #304

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Wed Sep 25, 2019 3:21 pm

I saw some new films and I rewatched some films.
New films:
Hellboy (2004)
Hellboy II: The Golden Army (2008)
Jurassic World (2015)
Hell or High Water (2016)
A Chinese Odyssey: Part One - Pandora's Box (1995)
A Chinese Odyssey: Part Two - Cinderella (1995)
A Chinese Ghost Story (2011)
Zhongkui: Snow Girl and the Dark Crystal (2015)
The White Haired Witch of Lunar Kingdom (2014)

Rewatches:
Dragon Inn (1992)
Memento (2000)
Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)
The Life of Oharu (1952)
Die Hard (1988)
Watchmen (2009)
V for Vendetta (2005)
Casino (1995)
The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007)
The Pianist (2002)
L.A. Confidential (1997)
Batman Begins (2005)

Out of all those, I enjoyed Memento, Terminator 2 and The Life of Oharu the most. Oharu really is a masterpiece (aesthetically speaking).

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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #305

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Wed Sep 25, 2019 3:41 pm

Anime series I watched and my short comment.

Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion (2006–2012)
I found this to be a rather complex mixture of politics, warfare, high school dramedy and a little fantasy. I didn't enjoy this as much as others maybe, but I certainly understand why this is so popular among anime fans. I personally loved the character of Lelouch. He is one of my favourite anime characters so far. (8/10)

Death Note (2006–2007)
This is very dark and twisted and I loved it. I would even say it is in my top 10 anime series. Last two episodes were absolutely brilliant. I expected something good because this is so popular and it didn't disappoint. (9/10)

Psycho-Pass (2012– )
Pretty good anime. I enjoyed this because of compelling narrative drive. This is one of those series which some will find 'deep', others incredibly pretentious. I must admit that there are times characters address philosophical themes of the show in a rather direct manner, which will annoy many people, but anyway... I liked it. (8/10)

Psycho-Pass: The Movie (2015)
Not much to say about this. It is a pretty decent action-packed anime. It is something that is probably best to watch between season 1 and season 2 of the series. (7/10)

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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #306

Postby Raxivace » Fri Sep 27, 2019 7:34 am

Lord_Lyndon wrote:I saw some new films and I rewatched some films.
I've seen a fair chunk of these.

New films:
Hellboy (2004)
Jurassic World (2015)
Hell or High Water (2016)
I remember liking Hellboy but I haven't seen it in a long time. Jurassic World is alright, and I liked Hell or High Water.

Rewatches:
Memento (2000)
Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991)
Die Hard (1988)
Watchmen (2009)
V for Vendetta (2005)
Casino (1995)
The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford (2007)
Batman Begins (2005)
I liked most of these. When I rewatched V for Vendetta for college it didn't really hold up for me (Can't say I liked the comic book a whole lot either when I read it). Watchmen I generally liked though, and I seem to be one of the few that doesn't hate Snyder for whatever reason.

Batman Begins I haven't seen in a long time. Memento is probably one of Nolan's better movies.

Casino I think is great. I kind of want to rewatch it (And Goodfellas, Mean Streets etc.) before The Irishman comes out here pretty soon.

Die Hard is a classic of the action genre. Terminator 2 is a movie I really liked when I first saw it back in 2008 or so but when I tried to rewatch it 5ish years ago I just couldn't get through that first 20 minutes for whatever reason. It might just have been in a weird mood back then, I dunno what I would think of it today and I never really explored the Terminator franchise beyond T2 anyways.

Assassination of Jesse James is probably my favorite of this list. I just loved how moody it was.

Life of Oharu will probably be the next Mizoguchi I see, though I'm not sure when I'll get to it.
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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #307

Postby Raxivace » Fri Sep 27, 2019 8:07 am

Lord_Lyndon wrote:Anime series I watched and my short comment.

Code Geass: Lelouch of the Rebellion (2006–2012)
I found this to be a rather complex mixture of politics, warfare, high school dramedy and a little fantasy. I didn't enjoy this as much as others maybe, but I certainly understand why this is so popular among anime fans. I personally loved the character of Lelouch. He is one of my favourite anime characters so far. (8/10)

Death Note (2006–2007)
This is very dark and twisted and I loved it. I would even say it is in my top 10 anime series. Last two episodes were absolutely brilliant. I expected something good because this is so popular and it didn't disappoint. (9/10)
Yeah I really liked Code Geass. It does have its flaws (Particularly in the R2 season) though its quite a trip.

It does actually make a pretty interesting comparison with Death Note too since both started the same year and Lelouch and Light are fairly similar characters though filtered through entirely different genres, with Code Geass taking inspiration from the original Mobile Suit Gundam and such while Death Note seemed more influenced by thrillers and detective stories. I'd probably have to rewatch Death Note to really talk about it though, I probably haven't seen it in about a decade. I'm kind of morbidly curious about that live action Netflix adaptation with Willem Dafoe too.

I will say that "L's Theme B" was a song I played a lot to while studying in school and I still put it while reading every now and then.



BADA-DADA-BADA-DADA

Psycho-Pass (2012– )
Pretty good anime. I enjoyed this because of compelling narrative drive. This is one of those series which some will find 'deep', others incredibly pretentious. I must admit that there are times characters address philosophical themes of the show in a rather direct manner, which will annoy many people, but anyway... I liked it. (8/10)

Psycho-Pass: The Movie (2015)
Not much to say about this. It is a pretty decent action-packed anime. It is something that is probably best to watch between season 1 and season 2 of the series. (7/10)
I tried watching Psycho-Pass a few years ago and couldn't make it past the first few episodes. The overt philosophizing was too on the nose for me for something that wasn't a Godard film, and it seemed to have the problem I have with a lot of Urobuchi's other stuff in that it deploys kind of empty shock value a lot (Even Fate/Zero, a show I otherwise quite liked, suffers heavily from this in parts). The "crime" in the first episode I remember being particularly kind of ridiculous.
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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #308

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Fri Sep 27, 2019 11:07 am

Raxivace wrote:Watchmen I generally liked though, and I seem to be one of the few that doesn't hate Snyder for whatever reason.


I quite like his films. I even liked Sucker Punch.

Terminator 2 is a movie I really liked when I first saw it back in 2008 or so but when I tried to rewatch it 5ish years ago I just couldn't get through that first 20 minutes for whatever reason. It might just have been in a weird mood back then, I dunno what I would think of it today and I never really explored the Terminator franchise beyond T2 anyways.


There are many people who loved T2, but there are also people who found it too cheesy.

Life of Oharu will probably be the next Mizoguchi I see, though I'm not sure when I'll get to it.


Also check out the 'Chinese Odyssey' films. Those are Hong Kong classics.

It does actually make a pretty interesting comparison with Death Note...


I noticed that all three shows (even Psycho-Pass) feature characters trying to fight what they perceive to be social injustice. What I liked about all three shows is that they blur the lines between what is usually considered right or wrong. That made all three series quite a compelling watch.

Anyway, I'll get back when I see more anime. Thanks for the response, Rax.

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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #309

Postby Raxivace » Sun Sep 29, 2019 10:10 am

Lord_Lyndon wrote:I quite like his films. I even liked Sucker Punch.
That's one I haven't seen yet. I'm curious about it at least.

Also check out the 'Chinese Odyssey' films. Those are Hong Kong classics.
Will make a note of it. I only have marginally more experience with Chinese films than I do with Bollywood lol.

I noticed that all three shows (even Psycho-Pass) feature characters trying to fight what they perceive to be social injustice. What I liked about all three shows is that they blur the lines between what is usually considered right or wrong. That made all three series quite a compelling watch.
Yeah. In the case of Code Geass I find this aspect particularly interesting because it basically does that by turning the premise of the original Mobile Suit Gundam on its head, where the masked exiled prince seeking revenge is turned from antagonist to the central protagonist, and the ace pilot fighting to protect the status quo he thinks is broken but still preferable is made the antagonist instead of the hero.

It adds a layer of genre commentary in addition to the blurred moral lines inherent to the story's premise.

BTW, I dunno if you're aware but apparently there's a new season of Psycho-Pass starting within a few weeks here soon. That might be something to look into since you liked the other seasons and the movie.
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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #310

Postby Raxivace » Sun Sep 29, 2019 10:45 am

Also I saw a couple of movies myself.

135. Berlin Alexanderplatz (1931, Dir. Phil Jutzi) – The original film adaptation of the novel. Having not read the original novel this version does seem to hit the same main points as the miniseries version, though it really doesn’t work in such short amount of time. Seriously, even without Fassbinder as a comparison this just feels too quick and sudden at 83 minutes in length.

This version all leads to a fairly out of place happy ending too, which is disappointing but honestly kind of surprising considering the original novel’s author worked on the screenplay. The special features on the blu-ray set suggest the production was troubled (Apparently the lead actor playing Franz Biberkopf was really worried having the character being too grimy would hurt his star image, among other things).

The first five or so minutes that focus on Franz leaving prison are probably the best part. One of the interviewees in the special features even compares this segment to the “city film” genre since there’s a lot of shots of the chaotic bustle of city life (People walking about, trains and cars running etc.) without too much focus on narrative. He specifically mentions the classic film Berlin: Symphony of a Great City in talking about this segment and while that film/genre is not the first thing that came to my mind watching it, it does seem like a totally valid comparison to me.

136. John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum (AKA Chapter John 3 Wick Parabellum, 2019, Dir. Chad Stahelski) – Like the first two Wicks this is kind of light on story but with excellent action, neon lights, and references to classic films (I’m pretty sure a scene where Wick stabs a guy in the eye is even a nod to Un Chien Andalou). Fun stuff, can’t wait for Chapter 4.

137. The End of Summer (1961, Dir. Yasujiro Ozu) – The most unerotic story of a love affair since Bresson’s Lancelot du Lac.
Well it’s not fair to expect something sexy here anyways since this is an Ozu movie and the affair in question involves people that are at least in their 60’s. If anything more emphasis is put on the children of the man involved react to it. Not one of my favorite Ozu’s to be honest- it really is the same kind of problem I had with Lancelot where it really does seem like this should be provoking more of a reaction out of the characters involved instead of a couple of stern comments here and there.

Also what the hell was with the ominous music in the ending? The way the birds start flying in even made me think of Hitchcock’s The Birds, even if that came out after this.

138. The Vault (2017, Dir. Dan Bush) – This is a bank heist film with the twist of…THE BANK BEING FUCKING HAUNTED!!!!!!!!!!!!!! OH SNAP!!!!!!!!!!!!!! FUCKING GHOSTS SAVE THE BANK FROM THE BANK ROBBERS!!!!!!!!!!!

Well I call it a twist but the supernatural aspect was spoiled by the Netflix description. That it was in the “horror” section should have been a giveaway too. Thing is, I’m guessing during the production of the movie they were thinking that the ghosts would be a twist since despite a few lines of foreshadowing no actual supernatural incidents start happening until roughly a third to halfway through the film. Perhaps the comparison could be made to something like From Dusk Till Dawn.

Unlike From Dusk Till Dawn though this movie is much more bland than my first paragraph suggests. It’s just kind of dull more than anything, it never really gets nuts the way this nuts kind of premise needs to really work.

139. The Big Clock (1948, Dir. John Farrow) – A guy at a news agency is framed by his corrupt boss (Charles Laughton) for the murder of a woman. Not a whole lot to say about this one either, but its just a really solidly done noir. The news building that the lead works at in particular has a really fun art deco-ish design.

140. Irma La Douce (1963, Dir. Billy Wilder) – Mostly solid romantic comedy about Jack Lemmon as a disgraced police officer falling in love with a prostitute. It really isn’t as risqué today as it would have been back in the day, though beyond that I think it’s just a solid example of its genre, which is what I’ve come to expect from a lot of these more lighthearted movies from Billy Wilder.

141. Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood (2019, Dir. Quentin Tarantino) – Ohh boy, I finally got around to the new Tarantino. I’m still processing this one and am not quite sure what to make of it, though I did like it overall.

The movie it reminded me most of was Hail, Caesar! from the Coens since that movie was also a tribute to an older generation of Hollywood (In HC its 50’s, in OUATIH it’s the early years of the New Hollywood), both pay heavy tribute to the western genre from basically the only major directors that even make westerns anymore (The Coens had made No Country For Old Men (Which I would argue is a western) and True Grit prior to Caesar and would go on to make The Ballad of Buster Scruggs afterwards, whereas Tarantino had made Django Unchained and The Hateful Eight), and both make comedic versions of Leftists the antagonists (In HC you have the Communist screenwriters, and in OUATIH you have the Manson family*), both rely of restaged/remade scenes of old films, and of course both the Coens and Tarantino have a postmodern collage aesthetic going on (Moreso with Tarantino though I think it’s there with the Coens as well).

*(This is a weird similarity though because in Hail, Caesar! I get the impression that the Coens have more distaste for them being screenwriters than they do for being associated with Communism, and in OUATIH I don't think Tarantino has no sympathy for what the Manson family kids are going on about. The reveal of Pitt's trailer home for example immediately being contrasted by DiCaprio's rather nice home being explored in way more detail immediately comes to mind and certainly evokes recent discussions in culture about income inequality and such).

Anyways as far as OUATIH itself goes I did like how laid back it was- it seemed even more plotless than Jackie Brown did. I could watch DiCaprio do those western scenes for ages. The guy playing Bruce Lee was very charismatic too. Really I thought all of the performances just worked.

Right now the biggest mystery though is what to make of Brad Pitt's character, specifically since the ambiguity of whether he killed his wife or not doesn't seem to really get resolved in the movie. Its especially weird since its largely Pitt's character who fights off most of the attackers from the Manson family in the ending, "fixing history" and preventing Sharon Tate from getting murdered (Who's played very well by Margot Robbie btw). I'm not entirely sure what Tarantino is getting at here beyond a general "morality is complicated" type message. When you compare it to movies like Django Unchained or Inglourious Basterds, Django and Aldo are more inherently sympathetic, though Pitt in this movie always seems a bit more distant to me because of that ambiguity. I'd be curious to know what other people though of him here.

I haven't read too much about the film, except for a very good article by Jeff Smith on Bordwell's website that contextualizes a lot of the movie. There's a brief followup piece as well.
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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #311

Postby Raxivace » Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:02 pm

Maz wtf where are you? I thought you wanted to talk about Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood. [sad]

142. Die Nibelungen: Siegfried (1924, Dir. Fritz Lang) – The first part of Lang’s classic adaptation of the Nibelung story. Similar to his later work in Metropolis, Lang really has an excellent sense of how to do epic filmmaking- the movie is just visually dazzling for the most part.

The one thing that might look a little dopey for some people is the dragon that Siegfried fights in the beginning of the film (I'm pretty sure its supposed to be Fafnir though they don't actually name him as such in the film)…

Image

Though I will say he looks fine for a silent era production. Actually, I was pretty impressed how many parts of him look like they’re independently moving, such as neck, eyes, tail etc.

Image

^Oh yeah, they got him to breathe fire too which is pretty badass.

It’s a shame I suck at scheduling because I had planned to watch the sequel movie before October horror marathoning started this year but unfortunately it didn’t work out. I’ll have to put it off until November, where I have a whole slew of other movies based on epics/mythology I want to watch.

143. Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare (1991, Dir. Rachel Talalay) – Of course, similar to how the multiple Friday the 13th movies with the word “Final” in the title weren’t the end of Jason, this certainly wasn’t the end of Freddy…

06 Freddys Dead The Final Nightmare - Horror 1991 Eng Subs 720p [H264-mp4].mp4_snapshot_00.00.29_[2019.10.03_12.22.33].jpg
06 Freddys Dead The Final Nightmare - Horror 1991 Eng Subs 720p [H264-mp4].mp4_snapshot_00.00.29_[2019.10.03_12.22.33].jpg (153.76 KiB) Viewed 97 times


06 Freddys Dead The Final Nightmare - Horror 1991 Eng Subs 720p [H264-mp4].mp4_snapshot_00.00.36_[2019.10.03_12.22.51].jpg
06 Freddys Dead The Final Nightmare - Horror 1991 Eng Subs 720p [H264-mp4].mp4_snapshot_00.00.36_[2019.10.03_12.22.51].jpg (52.75 KiB) Viewed 97 times

^Like all thoughtful movies Freddy's Dead opens up with a thoughtful juxtaposition of famous quotes.

Anyways this is pretty genuinely weak film. Tons of laps in character logic, the kills are kind of rote, bad early 90’s hair etc. They try to give even more backstory to Freddy here and none of it seems necessary. Like, the big twist of the movie here is that an amnesiac man that Freddy has been trolling the whole film believes himself to be Freddy’s son, but it turns out he’s not (Interestingly, we never even find out what this guy’s deal precisely is and he dies without us ever learning about his past) but instead that Freddy has a daughter.
I liked this better than Parts 4 or 5 but eh it really does feel like the franchise has run its course by this point (Though I seem to remember New Nightmare being decent and of course I think Freddy vs Jason is fun. I have little optimism for the 2010 remake though).

Years ago I heard someone suggest that despite the dream premise of the Nightmare franchise that the Friday the 13th franchise is actually the more inventive overall and I kind of have to agree. Those films seemed more willing to try wildly different shit (Movies without Jason, movies where Jason has strange supernatural powers, movies where Jason is in bizarre new settings etc.), whereas Nightmare seems more conservative by comparison. It’s always Freddy, he always has same basic abilities, he always has bad one liners etc. In the main series at least it seems like Dream Warriors is the only time they really tried to change the fundamentals of the franchise up by giving the victims actual powers to use against Freddy but even that is ultimately abandoned. It's a real shame too because it never feels like the full potential of the ideas here are ever mined out, even in terms of goofy horror movie cheese.

06 Freddys Dead The Final Nightmare - Horror 1991 Eng Subs 720p [H264-mp4].mp4_snapshot_01.27.27_[2019.10.03_12.23.08].jpg
06 Freddys Dead The Final Nightmare - Horror 1991 Eng Subs 720p [H264-mp4].mp4_snapshot_01.27.27_[2019.10.03_12.23.08].jpg (172.71 KiB) Viewed 97 times

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Fate/stay night: Unlimited Blade Works (2014-2015) – Yeah this is clearly the superior adaptation when compared to the 2010 movie. Its quite a fun watch and the animation is pretty consistently fantastic.

It is kind of interesting to note though that despite the movie being more hypercondensed, it is probably the more faithful adaptation all things considered (Note: “Faithful” does not mean “better”). This TV version actually expands several scenes (Caster's flashback, Illya's main flashback, the epilogue at the end of the series is greatly expanded (Not Sunny Day, the actual ending) etc.), changes the location of some (Caster’s kidnapping of Taiga happens under fairly different circumstances. Many others are changing conversations as to happening while characters are walking home instead of, say, just sitting around their living room or kitchen table). It also seems to presume different knowledge: the UBW route of the original VN was specifically a reaction to the earlier Fate route. This anime on the other seems to presume the audience has seen the prequel series Fate/Zero, which is pretty important because Fate/Zero spoils tons of a the VN’s twists pretty early on. Illya and Kiritsugu immediately come to mind here- in the original VN that they even had some kind of relationship is only implied IIRC. That's spoiled 10 minutes into Fate/Zero and in this particular anime Illya gives a somewhat out of place monologue spelling out just what she's so mad about that doesn't really exist in the original VN (From what I remember anyways).

It’s honestly not THAT different of a philosophy as to what the 2006 anime adaptation did in regards to fidelity, though UBW 2014 at least seems to do change things with more purpose. The expansion on Caster’s backstory in particularly makes me wonder if some of the changes aren't coming from some other source- I remember it being fairly brief in the original VN (So brief that her original Master doesn’t even get a sprite. She also comes off more sympathetically in deciding to murder him in the anime too. It took maybe like a few minutes to get through in that whereas in the anime it takes up at least half of an entire episode.

While I like most of the anime's changes and expansions the one thing I'm not thrilled about is what they did with the very very very end of the story. This route in the VN ends with Archer ruminating on how despite his growth after fighting with Shirou he'll still lose his memories once he returns to the Grail and continue to be summoned over and over again, not knowing that he hadn't already given up on his goal or not. He's basically fucked for all eternity. The anime really waters this sentiment down and only has him considering about Shirou's fate specifically, which is in the original text sure but really kind of underplays just how bad "becoming Archer" really is.

The movie on the other hand just kind of adapted the text of the VN as written. In a way it reminds of how the Coen brothers' adaptation of True Grit in pure numerical terms actually made far more changes to the Charles Portis novel than the Henry Hatahway version did, though the Coen’s kept a tone closer to the novel as well as the novel’s ending.

I think I still ultimately prefer what the VN did, but as far as the various adaptations and spinoffs and such go this still is probably the closest I’ve come to really liking something in this franchise as much as the original VN.
"[Cinema] is a labyrinth with a treacherous resemblance to reality." - Andrew Sarris

Lord_Lyndon
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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #312

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Wed Oct 09, 2019 2:17 am

Raxivace wrote:Yeah. In the case of Code Geass I find this aspect particularly interesting because it basically does that by turning the premise of the original Mobile Suit Gundam on its head, where the masked exiled prince seeking revenge is turned from antagonist to the central protagonist, and the ace pilot fighting to protect the status quo he thinks is broken but still preferable is made the antagonist instead of the hero.

It adds a layer of genre commentary in addition to the blurred moral lines inherent to the story's premise.

BTW, I dunno if you're aware but apparently there's a new season of Psycho-Pass starting within a few weeks here soon. That might be something to look into since you liked the other seasons and the movie.


Okay. I will check out this Gundam anime in the future. Thanks for the info on new Psycho-Pass season. I will check it out.

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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #313

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Wed Oct 09, 2019 2:36 am

I saw some new films in the meantime.
Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (1981; George Miller)(this was a rewatch)
The Puppetmaster (1993; Hou Hsiao-Hsien)
The Emperor and the Assassin (1998; Chen Kaige)
Yellow Earth (1984; Chen Kaige)
Life on a String (1991; Chen Kaige)
Fear X (2003; Nicolas Winding Refn)
Riding Alone for Thousands of Miles (2005; Zhang Yimou)
A Snake of June (2002; Shin'ya Tsukamoto)
What Time Is It There? (2001; Tsai Ming-liang)
Like Someone in Love (2012; Abbas Kiarostami)
Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives (2010; Apichatpong Weerasethakul)
Knight of Cups (2015; Terrence Malick)
Sky Hunter (2017; Li Chen)
Barking Dogs Never Bite (2000; Bong Joon-ho)
American Hustle (2013; David O. Russell)
Joy (2015; David O. Russell)
Atomic Blonde (2017; David Leitch)
Long Shot (2019; Jonathan Levine)
Bandslam (2009; Todd Graff)
Polar (2019; Jonas Åkerlund)
Mulholland Falls (1996; Lee Tamahori)
Destination Wedding (2018; Victor Levin)

The Puppetmaster is by far the best film on this list. I would even go as far as saying that it is one of the greatest films of all time. I hope you will see it one day.

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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #314

Postby Raxivace » Wed Oct 09, 2019 6:37 pm

^Of that bunch I've only seen Mad Max 2 (Which is great), American Hustle (Which is fine, but I wasn't super into) and Joy (Which I didn't really care for in general).

I'm definitely interested in seeing The Puppetmaster. I've been getting into Taiwanese New Wave lately through watching Edward Yang's stuff (Which has all been at least pretty good so far, with A Brighter Summer Day being a masterpiece IMO), so I'll probably move onto Hou here soon.
"[Cinema] is a labyrinth with a treacherous resemblance to reality." - Andrew Sarris

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Re: Raxivace's 2019 List of Movies or: (Goodbye to Neo-General Chat 3D)   Reply #315

Postby Raxivace » Tue Oct 15, 2019 4:21 am

144. Fate/stay night: Heaven’s Feel I. Presage Flower (2017, Dir. Tomonori Sudo)

145. Fate/stay Night: Heaven’s Feel II. Lost Butterfly (2019, Dir. Tomonori Sudo) – The first two films in the adaptation trilogy of the Heaven’s Feel route in the F/SN visual novel. Like the rest of the Fate anime the basic plot is too bonkers to directly explain, though I will say compared to the route in the VN the tone is very changed. The VN made the story a weird psychosexual horror thing as a contrast to the more action heavy focus of the Fate and Unlimited Blade Works routes, but these films seem to make it more, well, action heavy again. Like in the VN many characters that are killed off quickly and brutally but in the films they get elaborate five minute action scenes before dying which just really changes the feel of things.

The thing is the action scenes themselves are top notch and exciting to watch but I’m not sure as a whole what its’ really meant to add to the Heaven’s Feel story. This is to say nothing of sexual horror elements being downplayed without quite being absent in these films…at least at this point. There’s still a lot of story left for the final film to adapt and I’m really curious to see what ufotable will do with it next year, especially after seeing how they expanded on Unlimited Blade Works ending in their tv show adaptation. I’m hoping this means they’ll change the ending to Heaven’s Feel a bit as that was by far my largest issue with the entire original visual novel.

146. Scream (1996, Dir. Wes Craven) – I’m pretty sure I had seen parts of this film before, but having actually seen the full thing now I think its pretty clever. Kind of bizarre to see Courtney Cox playing against type at the height of Friends, though I think she was good here.
I remember seeing someone on…Criterion Forum, I think, derisively compare Funny Games to this film and I think I would actually agree this is the more thoughtful take on horror films and such compared to Haneke’s lecturing.

147. The Last Man on Earth (1964, Dir. Ubaldo Ragona & Sidney Salkow) – If you’ve seen the I Am Legend with Will Smith, this film is another adaptation of the same short story (Which is also called I Am Legend). It’s the same basic story as the Will Smith version, though it has Vincent Price in the lead role doing his wonderfully campy Vincent Price thing.

Stylistically though this film is kind of interesting because the vampires that torment Price, despite talking and taunting him and such, really do seem anticipate Romero’s zombies and Night of the Living Dead (Carnival of Souls maybe being the other major film that anticipates Romero, at least that I’m aware of). Everything from the way they carry themselves and skulk about really just seems prescient of zombies. Even the fact that they’re created from a virus seems way more like modern zombies and not vampires (Which makes it kind of silly that garlic and mirrors are effective against the vampires in this movie for something created by biology and not like magic or whatever but still).

148. Rodan (1956, Dir. Ishiro Honda) – Starts off almost as a murder mystery or some sort, with people accusing each other of committing murder and such, until the killer is revealed to be a bug kaiju thing and then Rodan appears and the military has to fight them. Rodan as a monster is fun of course but as a movie this is not in the same realm as what Honda was doing with Godzilla or even what he would do with Mothra (Though like Mothra, it is weird how it seems to start off as different kind of genre film- in that case it was a newspaper film).

149. The Phantom of the Opera (1925, Dir. Rupert Julian, Lon Chaney, Ernst Laemmle, & Edward Sedgwick) – I wasn’t familiar with the basic Phantom of the Opera story before watching this but I found it to be a pretty fun film. The elaborate opera set was neat and “the Phantom” was pretty compelling as a character for a silent era film. That makeup job on Chaney too sure is something!

150. The Invisible Man Returns (1940, Dir. Joe May) – Vincent Price becomes the Invisible Man and decides to troll the fuck out of people for revenge before turning insane. Not one of the better Universal horror sequels though its interesting seeing Price in such an early role. I didn’t even know he was in this film before I went to watch it!

151. El Camino: A Breaking Bad Movie (2019, Dir. Vince Gilligan) – I’m really torn on this one. On the one hand, it really contributes nothing at all to Breaking Bad’s story. It mostly takes places within a period of like 72 hours after the end of the series (It’s basically the cops chasing after Jesse and that’s the whole movie, with flashbacks sprinkled in) and ends Jesse’s story in a pretty similar place that the show already did.

On the other hand, it is nice to see Aaron Paul as Jesse again (As well as other minor characters. Robert Forster is of course a particularly bittersweet example since while it was nice to see him in this again he also passed away the day this film released on Netflix), and Gilligan and co. really are pretty good at Hitchcockian “man on the run” suspense filmmaking. Still, as good as they are at that and as fun as it is to watch, it really doesn’t expand my understanding of Jesse as a character or the Breaking Bad story in general, especially compared to something like Better Call Saul.

Sometimes I wonder if the so called “Golden Age of Television” has made it so people have no idea how to tell an entire story in the span of a two hour feature film, and as much as I liked Breaking Bad and even enjoyed watching El Camino, it still has me wondering.

EDIT: Perhaps an interesting comparison to El Camino would be the the Cowboy Bebop movie, Knockin' on Heaven's Door. Knockin' on Heaven's Door similarly is "just" another kind of exercise in genre filmmaking featuring the cast from that show that also doesn't address any of the ambiguity in the ending of the TV series (Does Spike die or not? How do Faye and Jet react? etc). I think the main difference though is that El Camino teeters much closer on the actual ending of Breaking Bad, which perhaps makes the the fact that it doesn't really deepen that ending or Jesse as a character all the more weirder. In comparison, it's not like Knockin' on Heaven's Door is needlessly throwing in characters from Bebop's endgame like Vicious for no reason.
"[Cinema] is a labyrinth with a treacherous resemblance to reality." - Andrew Sarris


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