I made a 2019 thread too

Derived Absurdity
Ultimate Poster
Posts: 2547
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2015 5:07 am

Re: I made a 2019 thread too   Reply #100

Postby Derived Absurdity » Fri Aug 23, 2019 12:50 pm

The Favourite is definitely the most mainstream-ish of his movies I've seen because it's not as surreal or dark, but they're all basically similar - bleak, mean, meaningless, provocative/edgy. There's not really much more to them. The Killing of a Sacred Deer is a modern retelling of a Greek play, The Lobster is attempting to comment on society's treatment of romance/love with little success IMO, and Dogtooth... well I don't know, it's been several years since I've seen it, but it's not different. I haven't seen Alps but it's probably the exact same.

User avatar
Eva Yojimbo
Ultra Poster
Posts: 758
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2017 5:34 pm
Location: The Land of Cows and Twisters

Re: I made a 2019 thread too   Reply #101

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Mon Aug 26, 2019 12:49 pm

Derived Absurdity wrote:Inherent Vice - full confession: I only watched this for the sex scene. It was good. The sex scene was good. I guess the rest was good, I don't know, I was on my phone the whole time.
[none]

I actually rather liked that one. There are a lot of films about stoners that always feel too sober to me (stylistically), but that movie just feels like it exists in a cloud of pot smoke. I remember little about the characters or plot, but that feeling of drifting through the events in a weird haze has stuck with me.

Derived Absurdity wrote:Before Sunset - I liked this one a lot more.
Interesting thoughts. For whatever reason, I don't remember this one as well as Sunrise. Perhaps because I saw Sunset long after Sunrise and the latter had already left a big impression on me so I already knew what (basically) to expect. I don't disagree about the characters being "smarter" and "more mature" but I'm not sure that's an innate positive. It reminds me of a lot of musical artists that "mature" and become boring compared to their earlier stuff that was much more exciting and innovative even if it was rough around the edges. Now, I don't think Sunset was boring/dull by any means, and I definitely appreciate how it's going for an entirely different tone/feel because of how the characters have changed, but I also felt like it was missing that "spark" that I saw in the first film. I still thought it was superb though, and I agree with most of the good stuff you said about it... I guess I just feel like I've seen more films like it--meaning films about adults working out the problems of adult life--than films like Sunrise that are so freewheeling, naive, jubilant, and just bursting with energy and idealism about life and love; probably because most filmmakers are too old themselves to connect to that feeling of youth. Maybe I just saw it at the right time.

FWIW, I've always very much felt that way about how socially structured age is. Maybe it's because my life took such a weird, independent turn itself in my early 20s but I've never felt much pressure to conform with the idea that I should be doing this or that by any given age. Even though I'm now in my mid-30s I don't feel like anything is really off-limits to me, it's just always a question of whether or not I want to invest the time to pursue it. There was even a story recently about a 90-something-year-old who was going to college, which goes to show how BS the whole concept of there being limits to what you can do at any given age is.
"As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being." -- Carl Jung

Derived Absurdity
Ultimate Poster
Posts: 2547
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2015 5:07 am

Re: I made a 2019 thread too   Reply #102

Postby Derived Absurdity » Mon Aug 26, 2019 5:03 pm

Oh yeah I kind of hate life and think optimism and idealism are stupid so movies that are bursting with energy and idealism and naivety and whatever kind of don't do much for me. You need some degree of cynicism and pessimism to connect with me 'cuz those are required in any honest reflection or appraisal of life, because it sucks. Before Sunset sort of had that, sort of, so it was better.

User avatar
Eva Yojimbo
Ultra Poster
Posts: 758
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2017 5:34 pm
Location: The Land of Cows and Twisters

Re: I made a 2019 thread too   Reply #103

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Tue Aug 27, 2019 12:21 pm

Derived Absurdity wrote:Oh yeah I kind of hate life and think optimism and idealism are stupid so movies that are bursting with energy and idealism and naivety and whatever kind of don't do much for me. You need some degree of cynicism and pessimism to connect with me 'cuz those are required in any honest reflection or appraisal of life, because it sucks. Before Sunset sort of had that, sort of, so it was better.
LOL, well, that explains a lot. I mean, I'm closer to the cynical/pessimistic type myself, but when it comes to films (or any dramatic art-form) I don't generally judge them for expressing different perspectives as long as I think they're doing it well. IOW, I don't think art should generally be an "I agree with the POV so it's good/I disagree with the POV so it's bad" kind of thing, especially because the best dramatic art tends to depict rather than judge (meaning: "this is who the characters are/what they think" rather than "this is what the author thinks"). That's why Shakespeare has survived as long as he has, because he was capable of non-judgmentally depicting such an incredible breadth and diversity of humanity while never (or rarely and, if so, obscurely) injecting his perspective.
"As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being." -- Carl Jung

User avatar
Raxivace
Ultimate Poster
Posts: 1816
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2017 6:35 am

Re: I made a 2019 thread too   Reply #104

Postby Raxivace » Wed Aug 28, 2019 2:36 am

Jimbo do you think there's more of a demand from audiences that art "judges" its characters these days?

This might be skewed from me spend too much time online but sometimes it seems like people want moralistic fables more than anything. It kind of reminds me of those that demand "likeable" main characters above all else.
"[Cinema] is a labyrinth with a treacherous resemblance to reality." - Andrew Sarris

User avatar
Eva Yojimbo
Ultra Poster
Posts: 758
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2017 5:34 pm
Location: The Land of Cows and Twisters

Re: I made a 2019 thread too   Reply #105

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Wed Aug 28, 2019 11:46 am

Raxivace wrote:Jimbo do you think there's more of a demand from audiences that art "judges" its characters these days?

This might be skewed from me spend too much time online but sometimes it seems like people want moralistic fables more than anything. It kind of reminds me of those that demand "likeable" main characters above all else.
Honestly I'm not sure, since saying would require having a good historical understandings of what audiences expected and how they reacted to the judgement/depiction dichotomy in art. What I would say is that there was a fundamental change in popular aesthetic philosophy that started in Romanticism where art became primarily seen as the personal expression of artists rather than attempts at depicting people/reality as it was. MH Abrams called this difference "the mirror and the lamp" in his book on the subject; basically the idea is that a mirror reflects what is, while a lamp only illuminates what an individual points it at. If art becomes personal expression then it makes logical sense that part of that expression includes judgment. That also makes art easier to critique because judgment (especially of the philosophical and moral variety) comes naturally to people, much more so than more abstract aesthetic theories about intent, technique/style, narrative, tone, perspective, and whatnot.

I'm sure being online exaggerates this since it gives everybody a forum to offer their opinions and criticism. Most of what we have of the past generations is what critics and scholars have written about art, which also probably skews what the general perception was at the time (it's not as if critics/scholars and average people are frequently in agreement).
"As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being." -- Carl Jung

Derived Absurdity
Ultimate Poster
Posts: 2547
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2015 5:07 am

Re: I made a 2019 thread too   Reply #106

Postby Derived Absurdity » Sun Sep 08, 2019 10:57 pm

The Handmaid's Tale (season 2) - this season was the definition of "less than the sum of its parts". It was also a good example of how poor writing can fuck up an entire show/movie, even if everything else is stellar. The performances are fantastic. I'm not one to notice or care about cinematography very much, but even I appreciated how achingly beautiful practically every shot was, especially in the Waterford's house. But the writing was complete ass. There was never any stakes, no action ever had realistic consequences, there was no sense of progression or momentum, the world still makes no sense, none of the situations make any sense, and every moment that reaches for emotion is self-defeating because they're always entirely divorced from the rest of the show. June is essentially a sex slave, for example, and yet she runs away (while pregnant!), slaps her Commander, steals her baby from them, and so on, yet suffers absolutely no lasting consequences. A handmaid sets off a bomb that kills several high-ranking men, which leads nowhere. June escapes for several episodes and is brought back, with no short- or long-term repercussions and not even an investigation or nothing. It's unrealistic, to say the least, and saps away tension. There were a multitude of storylines and plot threads that just fizzled out randomly, so many that I lost track. This season didn't add anything of value at all. Most of the characters are still thin and vague, none of them went through anything approaching an arc except maybe Serena Joy if I'm generous. The scant info added about the world and how it came about just made it seem more implausible. It's devolved into repetitive torture porn.

When I said that this show was probably going to turn into some YA novel, I thought it would do that during this season, but it didn't. It's still going to, but since this one was slow slow and repetitive and pointless it's going to wait for the next season instead. Or the one after that. But it's clearly going to. A calling card of YA is that the protagonist always has to be "special" in some way, and Offred is being built up as being "special" as well, more resilient, stronger, the natural hero of the resistance, which goes against the historical spirit of dystopian fiction that the protagonist is just anybody. I would rather watch that than the torture porn I've been watching, but I would like even more for it to back to just being good.


Return to “Movies & Television”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

cron