Lord_Lyndon's movie thread

Lord_Lyndon
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Lord_Lyndon's movie thread

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Thu Jan 09, 2020 6:55 am

The Story of the Last Chrysanthemum (1939; Kenji Mizoguchi)
This was my sixth Mizoguchi. Aesthetically, this film is gorgeous, but the story never really caught my attention. I preferred the one I saw last year: The Life of Oharu (1952).

I Am Cuba (1964; Mikhail Kalatozov)
Excellent film by Kalatozov that is famous for its technical wizardry. I only found out after seeing the film that Kalatozov custom made his own rigs, dollies and camera mounts. Result is a film filled with remarkably complex long takes and some pretty daring camera-work. Impressive.

The Color of Pomegranates (1969; Sergei Parajanov)
Finally saw this iconic and legendary art film. Here is a short spoiler-free review for those who never heard about it:
''One of the great films in all cinema, virtually incomprehensible to anyone not familiar with Armenian or Georgian history and culture. Whatever the dubious politics in enjoying a subversive political work as an aesthetic spectacle, there is much to astonish. The nominal story concerns an 18th century Armenian poet/national hero/martyr, but Paradjanov rejects biographical narrative in favour of a montage stream of religious, political, cultural, sexual imagery, composition and allegory unparalelled in the history of the medium, although fans of Von Sternberg will not be bemused.''

Shadows of Forgotten Ancestors (1964; Sergei Parajanov)
Another brilliant film by Parajanov. Maybe even better in some ways than 'Pomegranates'. Just like in 'Cuba', the camera is the real star of the film: 'The movie, a sort of folk- Ukrainian "Romeo and Juliet," bursts with passion and physicality, chasing its protagonists through some of the most wild and beautiful landscapes ever caught on film. Yet the real romance here is between director Parajanov and the camera, which swoons and runs and bounds as ardently as any young lover, whether falling like a tree to the ground or spinning through a field or moping grief-stricken in a corner.'

The Bad Sleep Well (1960; Akira Kurosawa)
While this is not one of Kurosawa's best films, aesthetically or thematically, it is still a very good film. It was refreshing to see him tackle something that is not samurai-themed.

Vive L'Amour (1994; Tsai Ming-liang)
Another excellent film by Tsai. I really like his 'post-modern look on alienation' thing. I think this is maybe his purest film in that regard. I am saying that because he usually adds another layer of meaning to his films. But this one really seems like a film about lonely souls trying to connect.

The Hole (1998; Tsai Ming-liang)
Maybe even better than L'Amour. It is aesthetically brilliant. It is also a musical of sorts, where the musical numbers are in contrast to everything else in the film. He adds another layer of meaning with constant mention of strange disease affecting the population of Taiwan, which adds an almost apocalyptic feel to the film. And, of course, the hole itself, that connects two isolated people living in their apartments. Brilliant.

The Terrorizers (1986; Edward Yang)
My third Yang. And probably my favourite film in this post. This film, that was deemed a 'metaphysical mystery', really reveals itself by the end to be another ingenious film by Edward Yang. As more knowledgeable people than me have noted, Yang seems to be influenced by Antonioni. And in that respect, this is definitely his 'Blow-Up'. To say anything more would be to spoil it.
Last edited by Lord_Lyndon on Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:00 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #1

Postby Raxivace » Thu Jan 09, 2020 7:58 pm

I liked Bad Sleep Well quite a bit. If you liked that, Stray Dog and High & Low are also worth taking a look at if you want to see Kurosawa doing more noir.

Haven't seen any of these others, though Terrorizers is the next Yang I plan on watching. I Am Cuba is another I've been meaning to get to for a while now.
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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #2

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:04 am

Raxivace wrote:If you liked that, Stray Dog and High & Low are also worth taking a look at if you want to see Kurosawa doing more noir.


I saw them. I loved them both. High & Low is one of my favourite films.
The only major Kurosawa film I haven't seen is actually Red Beard (1965).

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #3

Postby Raxivace » Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:33 am

Ah, okay.

Red Beard seems really hit or miss with people. I know Jimbo and I weren't big fans, though I've known a lot of people that liked it.
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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #4

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:07 pm

Late Chrysanthemums vies with Sansho Dayu, and Chikamatsu... as my second favorite Mizoguchi after Ugetsu. I think Sansho is the most moving, Chrysanthemums the most beautiful, and Chikamatsu is like a mix of the two (with Ugetsu arguably being his most beautiful AND most moving film). I Am Cuba is, IMO, a true cinematic masterpiece. I reviewed it on EvaGeeks years ago: https://forum.evageeks.org/post/374150/Film-Most-satisfying-movie-you-have-seen-recently-2/#374150 Both those Parajanov's are excellent. IIRC I gave both 9/10s. I thought I reviewed them on EvaGeeks too but I can't find them--possibly one of those I put under spoiler tags that don't show up on Google searches. The Bad Sleep Well is pretty minor Kurosawa. Bizarrely visually bland compared to his other Shakespeare adaptations. Neither Vive L'Amour or The Hole are among my favorite Tsai's, though the former's pretty good. Of his earlier films I think The River is his best, but I also think he didn't get really good until What Time Is It There? (which is one of my favorites of the 21st Century). I really liked The Terrorirzers, but it definitely needs a rewatch. I didn't think it the masterpiece that ABSD or Yi Yi were, though.
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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #5

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Mon Jan 13, 2020 1:59 pm

Inventing the Abbotts (1997; Pat O'Connor)
Pretty solid romantic drama with Joaquin Phoenix in a leading role. Film examines class relations and relationship between two brothers (brother is played by Billy Crudup) in a small American town. This film was a nice surprise.

Pollock (2000; Ed Harris)
A very good film about the life and career of the American painter, Jackson Pollock. The subject matter is not something that would interest me, but I still thought it was good. Good acting.

The Giver (2014; Phillip Noyce)
Basically a less action-oriented version of Christian Bale film Equilibrium (2002). I really enjoyed this one. Taylor Swift is in it. In one short scene.

Army of Darkness (1992; Sam Raimi)
This is one of those special films that is purposefully ludicrous and cheesy. I really don't know why I didn't enjoy this one as much as other people did.

Star Trek Beyond (2016; Justin Lin)
A very action-packed film that was simply not as good as first two films with this cast.

Gattaca (1997; Andrew Niccol)
Excellent sci-fi drama/thriller by Niccol. Discrimination is the main theme here. I'm sure I'm not spoiling much by saying that. But this film is so popular that probably everyone has seen it by now.

The Crucible (1996; Nicholas Hytner)
An entertaining and over-the-top film about witch hunt in Salem. It was my 35th Winona Ryder film. She holds the record in that regard.

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #6

Postby Raxivace » Mon Jan 13, 2020 2:17 pm

Loved Army of Darkness. I liked Beyond about as much as Star Trek 1, though both are better than Into Darkness IMO. I'm pretty sure I've seen Gattaca but I don't remember too well. I did like The Crucible.
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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #7

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Mon Jan 13, 2020 2:20 pm

I also saw a bunch of Saoirse Ronan films.

Hanna (2011; Joe Wright)
A beautifully directed film in which she plays a super-assassin (kind of funny since she was so young and small). It needed a better screenplay, though.

Brooklyn (2015; John Crowley)
A romantic drama in which she plays an Irish immigrant trying to find a better life in 1950s Brooklyn. This is not my type of film, but I still sort of liked it.

On Chesil Beach (2017; Dominic Cooke)
Another romantic drama set in 1962 England. It was okay. I'm sure no one here will ever see it.

The Host (2013; Andrew Niccol)
Another interesting sci-fi drama by Niccol. It was based on a book by a girl who wrote Twilight. So you know what to expect. It was cheesy, boring and moving at the same time.

Lady Bird (2017; Greta Gerwig)
Critics loved this one. I thought it was only okay. It was mildly amusing.

The Lovely Bones (2009; Peter Jackson)
Now this one I liked. Even though I wasn't particularly impressed by Jackson's vision of afterlife. But everything else was pretty good. It was certainly moving. This is definitely one of Saoirse's best films.

I saw her other films in 2015. I think Byzantium (2012) is my favourite film of hers.

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #8

Postby Raxivace » Mon Jan 13, 2020 2:23 pm

Of those I liked Brooklyn quite a bit for a what it was- not often that we get sincere romance films like that anymore out of Hollywood. I didn't get the praise for Lady Bird at all.
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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #9

Postby Derived Absurdity » Tue Jan 14, 2020 9:41 pm

I didn't think there was anything to either like or dislike about Lady Bird very much. It was okay. It's one of those movies where I sort of suspect the critics either had some previous affinity for the director or they strongly saw themselves in the main character or something. I'm kind of mystified otherwise.

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #10

Postby Gendo » Tue Jan 14, 2020 10:25 pm

I've seen one of those. From over 4 years ago:

Gendo wrote:Hanna - Great stuff. Visually awesome. Story was very basic, but had good emotion and action.

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #11

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Tue Jan 21, 2020 8:51 pm

Shotgun Stories (2007; Jeff Nichols)
This little independent film is mostly famous because it channels early Malick. It is worth watching.

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #12

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Tue Jan 21, 2020 9:38 pm

I saw 10 Jessica Chastain movies in a row.

The Debt (2010; John Madden)
Excellent espionage thriller that is sort of similar to Spielberg's Munich. It is probably the film I enjoyed the most this year. Jessica is excellent in it.

Texas Killing Fields (2011; Ami Canaan Mann)
A nice surprise since this one was rated rather lowly. It is a serial killer film that has a pretty good atmosphere. I really liked it.

Take Shelter (2011; Jeff Nichols)
Interesting film by Nichols which addresses the issue of mental illness. I thought it was better than 'Shotgun Stories'. Michael Shannon is excellent in a leading role.

The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Them (2014; Ned Benson)
Solid romantic drama about dealing with loss. Jessica and James McAvoy gave very good performances.

Crimson Peak (2015; Guillermo del Toro)
Great visuals. Solid acting. But a very uninspired story. It is a horror/mystery that is not particularly scary. Definitely not one of del Toro's better films.

The Huntsman: Winter's War (2016; Cedric Nicolas-Troyan)
A mediocre fantasy movie, but this definitely IS my kind of movie. So I sort of enjoyed it.

The Zookeeper's Wife (2017; Niki Caro)
Those who have seen 'The Pianist' and 'Schindler's List' won't find anything revolutionary in this one. But it is a good movie. Worth watching.

Miss Sloane (2016; John Madden)
Very good political drama in which Jessica play a lobbyist. She is absolutely brilliant in this movie. There is no doubt in my mind that this is her best leading performance. And also her second best performance overall after her fantastic supporting turn in The Help (2011).

Molly's Game (2017; Aaron Sorkin)
In this film she plays a woman who organized poker games for some big shots. I enjoyed this a little bit more than Sorkin's previous film I saw, 'The Social Network'. I'm not saying it is necessarily a better film than 'Network', though.

Woman Walks Ahead (2017; Susanna White)
A hauntingly beautiful Western drama in which Jessica plays a woman who heads West to paint a portrait of Sitting Bull. The film is beautifully shot and wonderfully acted, especially by actor who played Sitting Bull (his name is Michael Greyeyes). I loved this movie so much that I would say it was the only film I've seen this year that actually meant something to me.

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #13

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Thu Jan 23, 2020 3:44 pm

Lord_Lyndon wrote:Inventing the Abbotts (1997; Pat O'Connor)
Pretty solid romantic drama with Joaquin Phoenix in a leading role. Film examines class relations and relationship between two brothers (brother is played by Billy Crudup) in a small American town. This film was a nice surprise.

Pollock (2000; Ed Harris)
A very good film about the life and career of the American painter, Jackson Pollock. The subject matter is not something that would interest me, but I still thought it was good. Good acting.

Army of Darkness (1992; Sam Raimi)
This is one of those special films that is purposefully ludicrous and cheesy. I really don't know why I didn't enjoy this one as much as other people did.

Gattaca (1997; Andrew Niccol)
Excellent sci-fi drama/thriller by Niccol. Discrimination is the main theme here. I'm sure I'm not spoiling much by saying that. But this film is so popular that probably everyone has seen it by now.

The Crucible (1996; Nicholas Hytner)
An entertaining and over-the-top film about witch hunt in Salem. It was my 35th Winona Ryder film. She holds the record in that regard.
I've seen these. Don't remember a ton about Inventing the Abbotts and Pollock. I remember thinking The Crucible was pretty silly back when I saw it. Gattaca is a good, solid sci-fi film. I thoguht I'd reviewed it, but I can't find it. Army of Darkness I liked the least out of the Evil Dead trilogy. Evil Dead II is still Raimi's masterpiece.

Lord_Lyndon wrote:I also saw a bunch of Saoirse Ronan films.

Hanna (2011; Joe Wright)
A beautifully directed film in which she plays a super-assassin (kind of funny since she was so young and small). It needed a better screenplay, though.

Brooklyn (2015; John Crowley)
A romantic drama in which she plays an Irish immigrant trying to find a better life in 1950s Brooklyn. This is not my type of film, but I still sort of liked it.

The Lovely Bones (2009; Peter Jackson)
Now this one I liked. Even though I wasn't particularly impressed by Jackson's vision of afterlife. But everything else was pretty good. It was certainly moving. This is definitely one of Saoirse's best films.
I liked (didn't love) The Lovely Bones too. It's also kinda silly, but saved by the visual imagination and interesting sustained tone. We both certainly liked it more than DA (check his thread). I reviewed both Hanna and Brooklyn:
Hanna (Joe Wright) – 7.5/10

Hanna is a fascinating hodgepodge of a film that presents a real challenge in trying to catalogue the kaleidoscope of genres it runs through. It opens as a survival film, with 15-year-old Hanna (Saoirse Ronan) living in isolation with father, Erik (Eric Bana), who’s trained her from birth to survive on her own; develops into a CIA action/thriller when Hanna is ready to go out into the world, but finds herself hunted by Marissa (Cate Blanchett), A CIA officer with a sordid history with Erik; and becomes a strange coming-of-age buddy film when Hanna meets a family on vacation and befriends Sophie, a girl her own age. Throughout it develops the air of a fairy tale courtesy of the Brothers Grimm book motif, all set to a distinctively futuristic, pulsing (and room-rattling) electronica score by The Chemical Brothers

I’d be lying if I said all of it works and gels into a coherent whole, but I’d be lying even more if I said it wasn’t thoroughly intriguing, if only because of its utter lack of predictability.

Director Joe Wright has quietly become one of the more accomplished cinematic stylists alive today, and his beautifully elegant but versatile craftsmanship is all over Hanna. When Hanna finally enters into the chaos and newness (to her) of the real world, Wright’s impressionistic images and montage achieves the kind of subjective narrative effect that Lenny Abramson fell short of in Room.

The cast is equally accomplished, with Saoirse Ronan giving more evidence that she’s one of the most gifted young actresses out there, while Bana and Blanchett provide a solid yin and yang to her story.

Perhaps Hanna is one of those films that’s more interesting than great—there’s just too many weird tonal leaps that the ending can’t resolve—but in an age of ever-blander, formulaic blockbusters, it’s a nice antidote.
Brooklyn (John Crowley) – 7/10
Brooklyn is an old­school romantic period drama­comedy about a young woman named Eilis (Saoirse Ronan)
who immigrants to Amerca from Ireland in hopes of finding a better life. She does, primarily in the form of a
young Italian named Tony (Emory Cohen), but when tragedy strikes she’s torn between staying or returning
home.

Remarkably, the film is played straight without a hint of the quirks and ironies that pervades most hipster­ish
indie romance films these days. As such, it’s the kind of film that can’t help but remind you of the genre’s
classics like Casablanca and Roman Holiday. Brooklyn even shares the latter’s visual lushness, courtesy of
cinematographer Yves Belanger, previously best known for lensing Dallas Byer’s Club. The film is consistently
gorgeously lit, typically with soft, diffused light, but with enough shading to add mood.

Director John Crowley has a classical sense of economic pacing as well. In the first 20 minutes the film
sprightly moves from Eilis’s dead­end life in Ireland, to her unpleasant boat ride to America, to her first days
in Brooklyn at her new job and new home. Finally, the film settles down as the romance is introduced and
Crowley is free to linger over the burgeoning love between the couple.

Really, though, this is Saoirse Rona’s film, and she carries it, seemingly effortlessly, from beginning to end.
Her character is not overwritten, so much of her performance is in reacting to what happens around her, such
as her giddy, gossiping roommates in the Brooklyn boarding house.

Perhaps the film’s only flaw is that there’s nothing new or original here, and the film feels a bit too predictable
at times. Still, it’s refreshing to see a modern romantic film with such a classical sensibility, well­crafted and
played by everyone involved.

Lord_Lyndon wrote:Take Shelter (2011; Jeff Nichols)
Interesting film by Nichols which addresses the issue of mental illness. I thought it was better than 'Shotgun Stories'. Michael Shannon is excellent in a leading role.

Crimson Peak (2015; Guillermo del Toro)
Great visuals. Solid acting. But a very uninspired story. It is a horror/mystery that is not particularly scary. Definitely not one of del Toro's better films.
Didn't care much for Take Shelter. I think DeRider and I had a pretty long discussion about on IMDb. Crimson Peak I loved. Here's my reviews for both:
Crimson Peak (Guillermo Del Toro) – 8.5/10

Del Toro’s best film since Pan’s Labyrinth is also one of the most visually sumptuous, if not downright decadent, films of this century. The plot involves the romance between a young, wannabe author, Edith (Mia Wasikowska) who falls in love with a down-on-his-luck inventor and baronet, Thomas (Tom Hiddleston). They marry, and after the death of Edith’s father, she moves into Thomas’s decaying estate with his sister, Lucille (Jessica Chastain), while frequently being visited and warned by gruesome ghosts.

Del Toro has clearly absorbed into his soul the look and feel of Victorian Gothic Romances and Horrors—think Wuthering Heights, Jane Eyre, and Edgar Allan Poe—as it drips from every frame of the film, from the ridiculously lavish production design to the lighting that’s so richly luminous it looks like technicolor. Rather than resorting to the contemporary and cloying teal/blue color-scheme trend, this film makes refreshing use of a complete tonal palette, with greens and reds being especially vivid during the chiaroscuro scenes.

Though the characters aren’t complex or original, the actors bring enough charisma to sell it. Wasikowska had previously played Jane Eyre and she has the perfect look for the naïve and nubile love-struck victim, while Hiddleston and Chastain continue to impress in far darker, more ambiguous, and interesting roles.

If forced to pick flaws I’d focus on the jerky narrative, which shifts focus too many times and probably would’ve been better if tied to Edith’s perspective; and Del Toro’s “concession” to certain contemporary style trends of keeping the camera moving with frequent cuts: though nowhere near as egregious as most, this is a film that screams for a more classical approach.

That said, I do think the flaws pale in comparison to the visionary splendor of the imagery and atmosphere. This is one of those films that will divide viewers who demand rich or original characters and plot-driven films from viewers capable of luxuriating in filmic aesthetics; those capable of the latter are in for one of the most glorious films of this century: essentially a film by a cinema aesthete for cinema aesthetes.
Take Shelter - Jeff Nichols - 6.0/10

Like with Mud, Nichols's follow-up to this film, Take Shelter isn't so much bad as it is utterly formulaic, lacking
in any real "wow" moments. However, this one feels more solidly sculpted from numerous angles: the premise
more interesting (schizophrenia dealing with delusions of an apocalyptic storm), the acting more compelling,
the pacing more measured, the shots better composed. The problem is that once we understand the tell-tale
signs of the schizophrenia, it becomes rather easy to separate reality from the illness. I do give the film
credit for dealing with the illness with serious, subtlety, and realism without overplaying it for melodrama (A
Beautiful Mind) or underplaying it for comedy (Benny & Joon). The final scene also ends things with a nice
touch of ambiguity, suggesting that there is no way to overcome such an illness by sheer will, and I can
appreciate that Nichols finally decides to leave the audience as unsure as his protagonist.
"As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light in the darkness of mere being." -- Carl Jung

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #14

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Thu Jan 23, 2020 9:24 pm

Wow. You've seen a lot of films, Eva. Thanks for posting your reviews. I really enjoyed reading them.
I understand why you liked 'Crimson Peak' so much more than me. You've always cared more about aesthetics rather than plot. I really don't know why I sometimes enjoy some film and sometimes not. The truth about me is that I've been suffering from mental illness for more than 10 years. And, with each passing year, it has been increasingly difficult for me to truly enjoy watching films. I am currently in a pretty bad state, but I guess I'll keep on trying until I find something that will hopefully be enjoyable for me.

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #15

Postby Raxivace » Fri Jan 24, 2020 5:22 pm

Lyndon, I don't know the specifics in your struggles but I wish you the best with them. We'll always be here no matter what happens.
"[Cinema] is a labyrinth with a treacherous resemblance to reality." - Andrew Sarris

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Re: Lord_Lyndon's movie thread   Reply #16

Postby Lord_Lyndon » Sat Jan 25, 2020 1:31 pm

Raxivace wrote:Lyndon, I don't know the specifics in your struggles but I wish you the best with them. We'll always be here no matter what happens.


Thanks a lot, Rax. I really appreciate it.


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