Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)

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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #150

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:13 pm

Raxivace wrote:
Eva Yojimbo wrote:Interesting stuff. Makes me wish I'd watched it more growing up. I remember when the first season was a big deal, and I think I caught an episode or two but that was back before I had a DVR so if I wanted to watch a show weekly I had to program the VCR, which was a PITA.
I think its a very engaging show but man there is a lot of it if you start now. They just wrapped up airing their 40th season a couple of months ago, and you have to commit for that much of something.
You're talking to a guy that started this year by watching nearly 800 hours of a table-top RPG streaming show. ;)

Raxivace wrote:
I heard about that Press Your Luck guy. I know they did a documentary on that, as well as the guy that cheated on UK's Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?
I've seen both of these documentaries, but its been a very long time since the Press Your Luck one. The WWTBAM one is interesting because the first hour is just a typical documentary about the guy, how they cheated, the consequences etc., and then the last 20 minutes or whatever are just his segment of the WWTBAM episode he was on played uninterrupted. You go into that footage now knowing how he was cheating though (IIRC it was a friend of his in the audience that would cough when the host would read the correct answer to a question), allowing you to "spot" the methods and such being used in real time- it becomes almost a game in its own right. Good stuff.
I saw the Millionaire one to, but I never got around to the PYL one.

Raxivace wrote:
Would've been cool to have a Doc-centered storyline that didn't solely revolve around a plague or someone else's illness. Definitely would've been funny too if Farnum was the one to burn everything down because of his petty bruised ego, lol.
There's the whole war veteran angle with Doc too that was interesting.

I think it honestly could have worked with Farnum. Like seeing a guy that was nominally the mayor just turning like that could have been good.
I think both Doc and Farnum represent missed opportunities to an extent. I mean, I like what they did with both characters for the most part but I feel like there was more that could've done in later seasons, or perhaps even in earlier seasons if they'd spread the attention around a little more.

Raxivace wrote:
All good points here. Yeah, Tarantino gets away with it because he's very self-aware and Basters is very open about being historical fantasy. Deadwood very much wasn't that, or wasn't that until the film at least. Dead on about people disliking uncertainty and ambiguity, especially when it comes to endings. I'd also say it's even more true when it comes to TV because people invest so much time into TV I think they feel like they deserve to end on some kind of conclusive note. Sopranos received a lot of hate for its ending for similar reasons (its ambiguity). I haven't seen GOT but I've wondered if the hate around its final season/ending isn't for similar reasons.
I'll try and dance around spoilers here, but with GoT its more that a character many people projected hard onto ended up not being the hero they thought they were going to be despite the character doing plenty of questionable shit throughtout the entire series and them doing something awful at the end of it that they had been saying they were going to do that entire show anyways...
That's fair enough. I generally don't get upset about the directions characters go in as long as there's some justification for it and it doesn't seem to come completely out of nowhere, so I doubt seriously if a character not ending up being a hero would bother me. If anything, it sounds quite interesting. From your description I'm also getting Shinji-esque vibes from it: setting a character up to be the hero, but then subverting those expectations.

Raxivace wrote:
Yeah, I agree with all of this. I can understand fan reactions being positive because fans root for the good guys and want the bad guys to get their comeuppances; but it is weird how critics have accepted it so, errr, uncritically. I'm sure Milch wanted to make the film to have an appropriate end of the series, but I do wonder how much pressure he felt to please fans and wrote it with that in mind.
Supposedly Milch had Alzheimer's already while writing the movie too, and well I don't make light of that but I have to imagine that affected the quality of his writing.
Yikes. Well, I know they've come a long way in treating Alzheimer's since I was a kid. My great grandmother had it from the time I was little and in her late years she didn't remember anyone or anything. It was pretty sad, especially for my grandmother who'd taken care of her for decades, and she didn't even remember her.

Raxivace wrote:
TBH, the thing that's taken me so long with my system is that I'd really love to invest in a full 4K system, but 4K AVRs are still kind of a mess and I also need to serve as a music system (which means an AVR with Dirac) as well as a home theater, and it's tough finding an AVR and player that can do everything I need. I keep thinking that if I wait long enough the ideal products will come along, but every time I check AVS forums people are complaining about the newest players/AVRs not being stable and tons of features having bugs. The good AVRs with Dirac are also still stupidly expensive ($4k is on the cheap side. :( ).
Dirac...as in, Dirac sea. That's that thing from Eva. I understand these words you're saying and what they mean.
LOL, sorry. Dirac is a Room Correction algorithm similar to Audyssey. If you've ever had an AVR that gave you a microphone and told you to set it up at various points in your room and then it made all the speakers do frequency sweeps, that's the basic idea. These programs measure how your room responds to sound and then adjusts accordingly for an even frequency response and also sets the frequency crossover between the speakers and subwoofer. Different programs do this differently. Dirac is almost universally recognized as the best when it comes to music as it was made by the company (Harmon) on the forefront of audio engineering science. Audyssey is fine for movies, but people have always complained it sounded crappy on music. A big reason for that is that there's an industry standard for mixing movies, but not for music, and Audyssey is tuned for the former.

Raxivace wrote:
Resnais was definitely the filmmaker most obsessed with memory. Muriel and Providence are about memory too, and Je t'aime, je t'aime is even a sci-fi film where a guy takes part in an experiment that backfires and he ends up reliving his past at random (that film was a huge influence on Eternal Sunshine too).
Tbh I've never quite seen Eternal Sunshine before. A teacher in high school put it on at the end of the year once, but the sound quality was basically inaudible and I had no idea what was happening. I dunno if that was also because of the Dirac sea but it sucked.
I wasn't crazy about Eternal Sunshine, but if you see Je t'aime, je t'aime there's no missing the influence.

Raxivace wrote:
TBH, I always thought Cloverfield was an odd film to make into a franchise, maybe because the initial film just works so well as a standalone entity, and, from what I've heard, 10CL is pretty tenuously connected to the events in the first film.
That the connection is only tenuous honestly works in 10CL's favor, because the characters themselves don't actually know what's going on because they're locked in a bunker the whole movie, and its like you're trying to figure out alongside the characters if its actually a Cloverfield sequel or just a thematic connection a la Twilight Zone or something.

Even without that though, John Goodman of Pyst fame is just awesome in the movie.
Even with that, though, it's an extremely odd way to make any kind of sequel, tenuously connected or not. I can't think of an analog in film history.

Raxivace wrote:I'll have to keep this in mind when I was L'Eclisse. I ordered the Red Desert blu-ray too btw.
I also wrote a long review for Red Desert that was on Cinelogue, and I'm pretty sure I still have it in my emails. I loved that film too. It felt like the most personal/emotional of all Antonioni's films.

Raxivace wrote:
As my reviews got longer I started hiding them under spoiler tags to take up less room on the forums, but the downside is that now I can't find them with a Google search.
You might have more success if you use EGF's internal search function.
Perhaps I should try that, though I'm not sure if that search would "see through" the spoiler tags either.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #151

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Thu Jul 23, 2020 2:20 pm

Raxivace wrote:91. She’s Gotta Have It (1986, Dir. Spike Lee) –

100. The Postman Always Rings Twice (1946, Dir. Tay Garnett) –

115. The Big Boss (1971, Dir. Wei Lo & Chia-Hsiang Wu) –
I remember liking She's Gotta Have It, but it does pale a bit if you watch it right after DTRT like I did. I still think it's a solid 7-8/10, though. Something about it always reminded me of Scorsese's Who's That Knocking at My Door, in being these very exuberant works by young directors before they made their masterpieces.

The original Postman is good but, yeah, it's got nothing on Double Indemnity. Fun fact is that there's actually an early version/adaptation of that story by Luchino Visconti from 1943 called Ossessione. I'd put it about equal with the '46 film. Hard to believe that the same guy that made Senso and The Leopard also made that.

I went through a Bruce Lee period as a kid and saw all those films. The only one that's really stuck with me is Enter the Dragon, probably because I saw it the most. I think I only saw The Big Boss once... I also remember Return of the Dragon because of the duel between Bruce Lee and Chuck Norris.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #152

Postby Raxivace » Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:48 pm

Eva Yojimbo wrote:You're talking to a guy that started this year by watching nearly 800 hours of a table-top RPG streaming show. ;)
Hmmm, there's about 600 hours of Survivor right now with about 30 extra hours added in non-Coronavirus years. That does add up eventually but I dunno how much them tabletoppers produce a year in comparison.

I saw the Millionaire one to, but I never got around to the PYL one.
I enjoyed it when I was a kid. I think that was one of the few documentaries I had even seen for the longest time.

I think both Doc and Farnum represent missed opportunities to an extent. I mean, I like what they did with both characters for the most part but I feel like there was more that could've done in later seasons, or perhaps even in earlier seasons if they'd spread the attention around a little more.
I agree, though obviously its easier to say this with the hindsight knowledge of how long the show ran.

That's fair enough. I generally don't get upset about the directions characters go in as long as there's some justification for it and it doesn't seem to come completely out of nowhere, so I doubt seriously if a character not ending up being a hero would bother me. If anything, it sounds quite interesting. From your description I'm also getting Shinji-esque vibes from it: setting a character up to be the hero, but then subverting those expectations.
FWIW people that didn't like the direction the character went in claim that it "came out of nowhere" though I had the opposite complaint for the character- that for years I felt like there was little other way that they were going to end up.

It is kind of Shinji-esque I suppose, though I think Shinji is a much better execution of a similar concept.

EDIT: The manga/anime series Attack on Titan also has a more effective version of the idea I think Game of Thrones is going for and other general similarities in its premise, but GoT also has other aspects I think it does better than AoT.

Yikes. Well, I know they've come a long way in treating Alzheimer's since I was a kid. My great grandmother had it from the time I was little and in her late years she didn't remember anyone or anything. It was pretty sad, especially for my grandmother who'd taken care of her for decades, and she didn't even remember her.
Alzheimer's claimed my own grandmother a few years ago. It was particularly hard for me to see her like that since she was a really well educated woman and very smart, so to see her to get confused and think I was her dead son all grown up was one of the rougher things I've gone through in recent years.

Part of me is kind of glad she passed away then and not now, with all of the coronavirus bullshit going on.

LOL, sorry. Dirac is a Room Correction algorithm similar to Audyssey. If you've ever had an AVR that gave you a microphone and told you to set it up at various points in your room and then it made all the speakers do frequency sweeps, that's the basic idea. These programs measure how your room responds to sound and then adjusts accordingly for an even frequency response and also sets the frequency crossover between the speakers and subwoofer. Different programs do this differently. Dirac is almost universally recognized as the best when it comes to music as it was made by the company (Harmon) on the forefront of audio engineering science. Audyssey is fine for movies, but people have always complained it sounded crappy on music. A big reason for that is that there's an industry standard for mixing movies, but not for music, and Audyssey is tuned for the former.
I've never messed around with that kind of thing before to be honest, but "Audyssey" is the kind of wordplay that should be justifiable grounds to stone someone.

Even with that, though, it's an extremely odd way to make any kind of sequel, tenuously connected or not. I can't think of an analog in film history.
Yeah I can't think of another example off of the top of my head either.

BTW, did you know there's a DHARMA Initiative logo hidden in Cloverfield 1? For years people tried to argue that meant it tied into Lost and wasn't just a cute nod.
Last edited by Raxivace on Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #153

Postby Raxivace » Thu Jul 23, 2020 6:50 pm

Eva Yojimbo wrote:I remember liking She's Gotta Have It, but it does pale a bit if you watch it right after DTRT like I did. I still think it's a solid 7-8/10, though. Something about it always reminded me of Scorsese's Who's That Knocking at My Door, in being these very exuberant works by young directors before they made their masterpieces.
Yeah it is kind of like that I guess. Spike had already been hugely influenced by Scorsese anyways (He's talked about seeing Mean Streets when he was a kid and such in interviews before), and was even personally mentored by the man when he went to school at NYU.

Fun fact is that there's actually an early version/adaptation of that story by Luchino Visconti from 1943 called Ossessione. I'd put it about equal with the '46 film. Hard to believe that the same guy that made Senso and The Leopard also made that.
I need to check out Visconti at some point. I know The Leopard comes up on Top 10 lists a lot at least.

I went through a Bruce Lee period as a kid and saw all those films. The only one that's really stuck with me is Enter the Dragon, probably because I saw it the most. I think I only saw The Big Boss once... I also remember Return of the Dragon because of the duel between Bruce Lee and Chuck Norris.
Sounds awesome, can't wait to get to that one.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #154

Postby Raxivace » Fri Jul 24, 2020 3:56 pm

Sight & Sound recently did a list of 50 "key" anime films. It's got a lot of picks you would expect (Ghibli, Satoshi Kon, Akira etc.), though I was pleasantly surprised to see Belladonna of Sadness there too, and while I liked Promare its perhaps a bit too recent of a pick for a list like this IMO. Really, from what I've seen Arcadia of My Youth is the only film I would say flatout shouldn't be on there because that's just not all that engaging of a movie and its "Japan did nothing wrong in WWII lol" subtext is a bit troubling.

End of Evangelion is the only thing of Anno's on there. Their description of it seems a bit odd to me.

Neon Genesis Evangelion: End of Evangelion is a tricky film to love, as what it does best requires substantial context: first, that it accompanies the far more hopeful ending of Anno Hideaki’s 26-episode Neon Genesis Evangelion TV series, serving more as a what-if or alternative timeline scenario than as a conclusive ending; second, that both series and film were highly auteur-driven and heavily influenced by production woes and mental health issues; and third, that the film was indelibly impacted by Anno’s bruising experience with the series’ fans, including death threats sent to the studio. The end result is a blisteringly caustic film wrapped in hallucinogenic horror, with visuals so potent they’ve stuck with fans for decades. While unsettling and even draining to watch, it’s hard to say – looking, for example, at the behaviour of modern-day comic-book fans – that there isn’t a place for a film so filled with rage.


It just seems like this kind of description misses the mark by like a lot. Like "rage" just seems like the wrong word to describe the film to me, and I think these "Anno just really hates anime fans! EoE is hate letter to them!" takes from the fucking 90's are totally outdated and ignore just how heavily NGE as a whole references other anime (Though mostly stuff I'm guessing Sight & Sound people are not familiar with, since stuff like Gundam/Mazinger Z/etc. that NGE does lift from and radically transform are also totally left off of lists like this), and that Anno continuously made anime after EoE and to this day.

Like come on. The implied comparison between anime fans and Comicsgate nonsense feels totally bullshit to me.

I will say it is still cool to see Sight & Sound include EoE in a list like this after they initially dismissed it as "Disneyesque bromides" back in the day, but it doesn't seem like their understanding of it is much better which is disappointing for a publication that's relatively prestigious.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #155

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Sat Jul 25, 2020 4:24 pm

Raxivace wrote:
Eva Yojimbo wrote:You're talking to a guy that started this year by watching nearly 800 hours of a table-top RPG streaming show. ;)
Hmmm, there's about 600 hours of Survivor right now with about 30 extra hours added in non-Coronavirus years. That does add up eventually but I dunno how much them tabletoppers produce a year in comparison.
Critical Role started in June of 2015, so 800 hours divided by 5 years is 160 hours a year. TBF, I also watched them on 1.5x-2x speed, so I spent significantly less than 800 hours watching it.

Raxivace wrote:
Yikes. Well, I know they've come a long way in treating Alzheimer's since I was a kid. My great grandmother had it from the time I was little and in her late years she didn't remember anyone or anything. It was pretty sad, especially for my grandmother who'd taken care of her for decades, and she didn't even remember her.
Alzheimer's claimed my own grandmother a few years ago. It was particularly hard for me to see her like that since she was a really well educated woman and very smart, so to see her to get confused and think I was her dead son all grown up was one of the rougher things I've gone through in recent years.

Part of me is kind of glad she passed away then and not now, with all of the coronavirus bullshit going on.
Yeah, Alzheimer's is really rough when it gets bad. I've heard that these days it's extremely important to catch it early for modern meds to really slow down the progression. I keep bugging my parents to get tested but they're both stubborn/proud and seem to have the mindset that if anything's wrong with them they'd rather not know about it (I'm the exact opposite). My own great-grandmother passed away on New Year's Eve of 1999. Whole family said she just didn't want to see the new millennium.

Raxivace wrote:I've never messed around with that kind of thing before to be honest, but "Audyssey" is the kind of wordplay that should be justifiable grounds to stone someone.
LOL. If you have an AVR that has it, I'd definitely recommend reading the manual and running it. It definitely makes a substantial difference. The two things that have the biggest impact on sound is speakers and rooms, and if you get speakers that measure well (many of them these days do), then most all of the sound coloration will come from the room.

Raxivace wrote:
Even with that, though, it's an extremely odd way to make any kind of sequel, tenuously connected or not. I can't think of an analog in film history.
Yeah I can't think of another example off of the top of my head either.

BTW, did you know there's a DHARMA Initiative logo hidden in Cloverfield 1? For years people tried to argue that meant it tied into Lost and wasn't just a cute nod.
Didnt' know about the Dharma thing in Cloverfield. Makes me want to watch it again and keep an eye out.

Raxivace wrote:
Fun fact is that there's actually an early version/adaptation of that story by Luchino Visconti from 1943 called Ossessione. I'd put it about equal with the '46 film. Hard to believe that the same guy that made Senso and The Leopard also made that.
I need to check out Visconti at some point. I know The Leopard comes up on Top 10 lists a lot at least.
Visconti's strange because he went from neorealism early on to the extremely lush, decadent, operatic films later on like The Leopard. Those later films are gorgeous to look at but I wouldn't say I've unabashedly loved any of them. My favorite Visconti so far has been Rocco and his Brothers, which is probably more on the neorealist side, but it's such an incredibly rich, novelistic film.

Interesting list. Top 10 makes me realize how I have absolutely zero knowledge/experience with the real classics of anime, which is pretty much anything prior to the 80s. Also interesting that two of those Eiichi/Animerama films made the top 10 (Belladonna and Thousand and One Nights). Beyond that, there's tons of familiar titles, but the ranking seems extremely bizarre. Like, I love Barefoot Gen and Angel's Egg, but to rank them before any Miyazaki, Takahata, or even stuff like Akira and Ghost in the Shell? Hell, even Wings of Honneamise, while pretty good, is kinda trash compared to EoE and Miyazaki's/Takahata's best.

Of course their take on EoE is outdated and misses the mark completely, but I can't think of many works of art that have been more grossly, completely misunderstood for so long than NGE and EoE, so it's disappointing but not surprising. Part of it makes me feel bad that I never really got around to writing some kind of definitive, all-inclusive companion to the series and film, as it desperately needs it.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #156

Postby Raxivace » Sat Jul 25, 2020 5:08 pm

Eva Yojimbo wrote:TBF, I also watched them on 1.5x-2x speed, so I spent significantly less than 800 hours watching it.
Image

Yeah, Alzheimer's is really rough when it gets bad. I've heard that these days it's extremely important to catch it early for modern meds to really slow down the progression. I keep bugging my parents to get tested but they're both stubborn/proud and seem to have the mindset that if anything's wrong with them they'd rather not know about it (I'm the exact opposite). My own great-grandmother passed away on New Year's Eve of 1999. Whole family said she just didn't want to see the new millennium.
Yeah you have to catch it ASAP. The signs were there for my own grandmother in retrospect, but there was overly complicated and stupid family political nonsense going at the time and we thought it was my aunt just turning her against us.

It's always sad when death gets associated with a holiday like that. Particularly something like New Years.

LOL. If you have an AVR that has it, I'd definitely recommend reading the manual and running it. It definitely makes a substantial difference. The two things that have the biggest impact on sound is speakers and rooms, and if you get speakers that measure well (many of them these days do), then most all of the sound coloration will come from the room.
Read the manual? LOL that is some crazy talk.

Next thing you know you'll tell us to "consult" with "experts" about "science" and "facts" about the "natural" "world" that we "live" in. Lol GTFO.

Visconti's strange because he went from neorealism early on to the extremely lush, decadent, operatic films later on like The Leopard. Those later films are gorgeous to look at but I wouldn't say I've unabashedly loved any of them. My favorite Visconti so far has been Rocco and his Brothers, which is probably more on the neorealist side, but it's such an incredibly rich, novelistic film.
Sounds kind of like the opposite of someone like Eastwood actually, starting out over the top and postmodern and such, but going more realistic over time (There's even an argument to be made that 15:17 to Paris is almost Eastwood trying to do neorealism). Of course he's just on my mind now because of that reaction gif.

Interesting list. Top 10 makes me realize how I have absolutely zero knowledge/experience with the real classics of anime, which is pretty much anything prior to the 80s.
At some point I'll work through some more of the 70's classics myself at least. Like Miyazaki and Takahata's run on Lupin seem to be well respected and Miyazaki also did that Future Boy Conan series as well. There's other stuff from that time people enjoy like Rose of Versaille and Aim for the Ace (The latter of which I'm told is what GunBuster starts out parodying).

Also interesting that two of those Eiichi/Animerama films made the top 10 (Belladonna and Thousand and One Nights). Beyond that, there's tons of familiar titles, but the ranking seems extremely bizarre.
I think its just put them in chronological order of release.

Of course their take on EoE is outdated and misses the mark completely, but I can't think of many works of art that have been more grossly, completely misunderstood for so long than NGE and EoE, so it's disappointing but not surprising. Part of it makes me feel bad that I never really got around to writing some kind of definitive, all-inclusive companion to the series and film, as it desperately needs it.
Honestly we should probably just co-author a book or something. Especially with the Netflix release reviving all of these dumb as hell takes and rumors and misinformation.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #157

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Tue Jul 28, 2020 2:27 pm

Raxivace wrote:
Eva Yojimbo wrote:TBF, I also watched them on 1.5x-2x speed, so I spent significantly less than 800 hours watching it.
Image
[biggrin] I actually watch everything on YouTube at 1.5x-2x speed except for music. I mean, those TTRPGs episodes are 3-4 hours each, and a lot of that time is spent with the players talking/planning about what they're going to do. Really no reason to play on regular speed for most of the runtime.

Raxivace wrote:
LOL. If you have an AVR that has it, I'd definitely recommend reading the manual and running it. It definitely makes a substantial difference. The two things that have the biggest impact on sound is speakers and rooms, and if you get speakers that measure well (many of them these days do), then most all of the sound coloration will come from the room.
Read the manual? LOL that is some crazy talk.

Next thing you know you'll tell us to "consult" with "experts" about "science" and "facts" about the "natural" "world" that we "live" in. Lol GTFO.
LOL, Reminds me of my dad's aversion to ever reading manuals. When I came along especially since he realized he could just always ask me to fix/set-up all electronics.

Raxivace wrote:
Visconti's strange because he went from neorealism early on to the extremely lush, decadent, operatic films later on like The Leopard. Those later films are gorgeous to look at but I wouldn't say I've unabashedly loved any of them. My favorite Visconti so far has been Rocco and his Brothers, which is probably more on the neorealist side, but it's such an incredibly rich, novelistic film.
Sounds kind of like the opposite of someone like Eastwood actually, starting out over the top and postmodern and such, but going more realistic over time (There's even an argument to be made that 15:17 to Paris is almost Eastwood trying to do neorealism). Of course he's just on my mind now because of that reaction gif.
That's actually a good contrast/comparison as I'd never considered Eastwood's career progression like that, but you're definitely right.

Raxivace wrote:
Also interesting that two of those Eiichi/Animerama films made the top 10 (Belladonna and Thousand and One Nights). Beyond that, there's tons of familiar titles, but the ranking seems extremely bizarre.
I think its just put them in chronological order of release.
Oh, that makes sense then. I don't see the point in putting numbers next to them though...

Raxivace wrote:
Of course their take on EoE is outdated and misses the mark completely, but I can't think of many works of art that have been more grossly, completely misunderstood for so long than NGE and EoE, so it's disappointing but not surprising. Part of it makes me feel bad that I never really got around to writing some kind of definitive, all-inclusive companion to the series and film, as it desperately needs it.
Honestly we should probably just co-author a book or something. Especially with the Netflix release reviving all of these dumb as hell takes and rumors and misinformation.
I'd love to but I know it would be a massive time-sink. Hell, the few music reviews I've written have taken me 2-3 days of writing/editing, and that's just for like 1000 words. That's not trying to figure out how to write and organize a massive companion book... and then the question of editing, publishing, etc. It probably would've been more feasible back when I was active on EGF, but doing it on my own sounds like a madman's undertaking. Although, I will say I've been reading the Dark Souls companion (You Died) and it's pretty damn loose and informal and mostly just feels like a love letter and trek down memory lane by the guys who wrote it, so... who knows.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #158

Postby Raxivace » Tue Jul 28, 2020 7:41 pm

Eva Yojimbo wrote:I actually watch everything on YouTube at 1.5x-2x speed except for music...Really no reason to play on regular speed for most of the runtime.
Mods, ban this filth.

LOL, Reminds me of my dad's aversion to ever reading manuals. When I came along especially since he realized he could just always ask me to fix/set-up all electronics.
That's what my father does. Even when he's asked me to teach him how to do something before he usually just whines until I do it for him anyways.

Like I swear to god it took him like 20 years to learn how to feed his own damn child through his g-tube properly. And even then he still has no idea how to replace something like that on his own. I think he's helped change a diaper all of once his whole life too.

That's actually a good contrast/comparison as I'd never considered Eastwood's career progression like that, but you're definitely right.
It was something I remembered a professor saying about Eastwood anyways back in the day.

Oh, that makes sense then. I don't see the point in putting numbers next to them though...
I guess people just like numbered lists, even when it doesn't necessarily make sense. Like "Top XYZ" articles and videos are still popular clickbait.

I'd love to but I know it would be a massive time-sink. Hell, the few music reviews I've written have taken me 2-3 days of writing/editing, and that's just for like 1000 words. That's not trying to figure out how to write and organize a massive companion book... and then the question of editing, publishing, etc. It probably would've been more feasible back when I was active on EGF, but doing it on my own sounds like a madman's undertaking. Although, I will say I've been reading the Dark Souls companion (You Died) and it's pretty damn loose and informal and mostly just feels like a love letter and trek down memory lane by the guys who wrote it, so... who knows.
Ah see I can't stand these loose and informal books like that. Like the one I read on Shadow of the Colossus was in that vein and it drove me up the wall.
"[Cinema] is a labyrinth with a treacherous resemblance to reality." - Andrew Sarris

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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #159

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Thu Jul 30, 2020 2:47 pm

Raxivace wrote:
Eva Yojimbo wrote:I actually watch everything on YouTube at 1.5x-2x speed except for music...Really no reason to play on regular speed for most of the runtime.
Mods, ban this filth.
Funny thing about watching stuff at that speed is that I go back to real life and it feels like everyone is talking/moving in slow-motion. I think my brain just permanently functions on a higher speed because even playing guitar my biggest mistake is that I would always be rushing things and making them more difficult to play than they really were.

Raxivace wrote:
LOL, Reminds me of my dad's aversion to ever reading manuals. When I came along especially since he realized he could just always ask me to fix/set-up all electronics.
That's what my father does. Even when he's asked me to teach him how to do something before he usually just whines until I do it for him anyways.
As bad as my dad is, he'll at least try to learn stuff. Like, I did eventually teach him how to use an iPad to access all his music and send it to his AVR to play drums to. I also set up my old PC in his room so he could watch Lost. My mom, however, refuses to learn anything new. Like, she's had a cellphone for years now and still struggles to log in and make calls because she does it so rarely.

Raxivace wrote:Like I swear to god it took him like 20 years to learn how to feed his own damn child through his g-tube properly. And even then he still has no idea how to replace something like that on his own. I think he's helped change a diaper all of once his whole life too.
Wait... what?

Raxivace wrote:
I'd love to but I know it would be a massive time-sink. Hell, the few music reviews I've written have taken me 2-3 days of writing/editing, and that's just for like 1000 words. That's not trying to figure out how to write and organize a massive companion book... and then the question of editing, publishing, etc. It probably would've been more feasible back when I was active on EGF, but doing it on my own sounds like a madman's undertaking. Although, I will say I've been reading the Dark Souls companion (You Died) and it's pretty damn loose and informal and mostly just feels like a love letter and trek down memory lane by the guys who wrote it, so... who knows.
Ah see I can't stand these loose and informal books like that. Like the one I read on Shadow of the Colossus was in that vein and it drove me up the wall.
I think a better title would've been "A Dark Souls Remembrance" rather than "A Dark Souls Companion." "Companions" are supposed to be information-dense books to help guide people through something, but this book feels mostly like a recounting of the writers' experiences first playing the game. Basically it seems there are chapters dedicated to each area that describes the area (I will admit there's some good writing in these parts that I mostly appreciate as writing in-and-of-itself; like, they described the music of Firelink Shrine as something like "bows scraping across violins like a razor blade across a vein," and that's just an awesome simile), and in between these there are chapter devoted to a variety of things, like VaatiVidya, or the English translator, or short-ish quotes from Miyazaki, etc. It's not a bad little read, but I don't feel I've learned much. I think the thing I gleaned most was just how different a game it must be playing it completely blind without any guides or maps.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #160

Postby Raxivace » Thu Jul 30, 2020 3:44 pm

Eva Yojimbo wrote:Funny thing about watching stuff at that speed is that I go back to real life and it feels like everyone is talking/moving in slow-motion. I think my brain just permanently functions on a higher speed because even playing guitar my biggest mistakIte is that I would always be rushing things and making them more difficult to play than they really were.
This is the danger of watching at 1.5x to 2.0x speed. It has hampered your ability to interpret the reality around you.

Had you watched at speeds any higher, you may have just vanished entirely...

As bad as my dad is, he'll at least try to learn stuff. Like, I did eventually teach him how to use an iPad to access all his music and send it to his AVR to play drums to. I also set up my old PC in his room so he could watch Lost. My mom, however, refuses to learn anything new. Like, she's had a cellphone for years now and still struggles to log in and make calls because she does it so rarely.
I'm sympathetic to technology complaints at least because a lot of this feels to me anyways like it doesn't always necessarily improve in ease of us as it changes over the years. Like iTunes is a much bigger pain in the butt to use now than it was a decade ago IMHO.

Where is Dad Jimbo's review of Lost? I need his take on Jacob v. MiB.

Wait... what?
My younger brother takes his medicine and eats 95% of his food through a gastrostomy tube, or g-tube for short. The pictures here are the exact kind my brother has. Essentially, you plug another tube into that one and feed him through that.

It's not at all difficult to use, but medicine and food has to be set up in proper amount beforehand (And cleaned afterwards) and feeding sessions alongside cathing usually takes about 15 minutes or so (Maybe a bit longer if for whatever reason formula just decides not to go down the tube very quickly)., and has to be done twice a day. You would think it would take less than 20 years to learn how to do something like this, especially for your own child's sake, but I guess some of us picked it up more quickly than others.

I think a better title would've been "A Dark Souls Remembrance" rather than "A Dark Souls Companion." "Companions" are supposed to be information-dense books to help guide people through something, but this book feels mostly like a recounting of the writers' experiences first playing the game. Basically it seems there are chapters dedicated to each area that describes the area (I will admit there's some good writing in these parts that I mostly appreciate as writing in-and-of-itself; like, they described the music of Firelink Shrine as something like "bows scraping across violins like a razor blade across a vein," and that's just an awesome simile), and in between these there are chapter devoted to a variety of things, like VaatiVidya, or the English translator, or short-ish quotes from Miyazaki, etc. It's not a bad little read, but I don't feel I've learned much. I think the thing I gleaned most was just how different a game it must be playing it completely blind without any guides or maps.
Honestly it might be how these things are titled and advertised that makes them bother me more than anything- I'm fine with "Remembrances" even if I'm not personally interested in them much, but don't call them "Companions" if that that's what they aren't. Like the SotC book was half the author recounting a relationship with...his brother or something, I don't even remember, and half Let's Play SotC in written form. There were interview bits sprinkled in here and there, but it was super light on anything that wasn't surface level-description about the damn game itself.

And honestly some of the interview bits were questionable in their own right and could have used some actual commentary of their own but lol video games criticism.

EDIT: Grammar.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #161

Postby Eva Yojimbo » Sat Aug 01, 2020 2:31 pm

Raxivace wrote:
As bad as my dad is, he'll at least try to learn stuff. Like, I did eventually teach him how to use an iPad to access all his music and send it to his AVR to play drums to. I also set up my old PC in his room so he could watch Lost. My mom, however, refuses to learn anything new. Like, she's had a cellphone for years now and still struggles to log in and make calls because she does it so rarely.
I'm sympathetic to technology complaints at least because a lot of this feels to me anyways like it doesn't always necessarily improve in ease of us as it changes over the years. Like iTunes is a much bigger pain in the butt to use now than it was a decade ago IMHO.

Where is Dad Jimbo's review of Lost? I need his take on Jacob v. MiB.
I think it really varies in terms of whether technology improves or worsens ease-of-use. It helps if you can find something stable and reliable, but that's the trick of it. Like, I now have all my music/movies on my NAS, which is much easier to access than my old CD/DVD racks, and it's easy to build super-long playlists on JRiver and listen at my convenience and it works all the time. However, my dad with his iPad setup isn't nearly as reliable because it's all wi-fi, so if for some reason his iPad or AVR has a weak connection then the whole thing can just stop working for no apparent reason.

Dad Jimbo is pretty laconic about such things, but he seemed to enjoy the show (the fact that he watched all of it says as much), but was quite confused by the end. I tried to talk him through some of our discussions/interpretations but he rarely seems interested in such things. Good thing about him with media is he's OK with stuff that's confusing/weird as long as he finds it entertaining, he doesn't have to understand everything. Again, my mom's very much the opposite.

Raxivace wrote:
Wait... what?
My younger brother takes his medicine and eats 95% of his food through a gastrostomy tube, or g-tube for short. The pictures here are the exact kind my brother has. Essentially, you plug another tube into that one and feed him through that.

It's not at all difficult to use, but medicine and food has to be set up in proper amount beforehand (And cleaned afterwards) and feeding sessions alongside cathing usually takes about 15 minutes or so (Maybe a bit longer if for whatever reason formula just decides not to go down the tube very quickly)., and has to be done twice a day. You would think it would take less than 20 years to learn how to do something like this, especially for your own child's sake, but I guess some of us picked it up more quickly than others.
Ah, I gotcha, thanks for the clarification.

Raxivace wrote:Honestly it might be how these things are titled and advertised that makes them bother me more than anything- I'm fine with "Remembrances" even if I'm not personally interested in them much, but don't call them "Companions" if that that's what they aren't. Like the SotC book was half the author recounting a relationship with...his brother or something, I don't even remember, and half Let's Play SotC in written form. There were interview bits sprinkled in here and there, but it was super light on anything that wasn't surface level-description about the damn game itself.

And honestly some of the interview bits were questionable in their own right and could have used some actual commentary of their own but lol video games criticism.
Yeah, I don't disagree with you. I haven't been able to read any more if it the past few nights as I've been reading/rereading the instruction booklet to the DS board game, which I did end up buying. Seems fairly simple, though I may tweak/home-brew a few rules... like, I hate how there's no option to upgrade vitality/stamina and how every character starts with the same amount. Of course, I get that I can't tweak that too much or it will probably unbalance the game, so it'll probably just be minor.
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Re: Raxivace's 2020 Movies or: (Neo-General Chat IV: Jimbo Gets Lost in Deadwood)   Reply #162

Postby Raxivace » Mon Aug 10, 2020 1:55 pm



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